11 LinkedIn Summary Examples: How to Create High Converting LinkedIn Profile Pages

11 LinkedIn Summary Examples: How to Create High Converting LinkedIn Profile Pages

When you are new to LinkedIn or have been engaging on the platform for a while without results, it’s easy to think the platform is not a good fit for marketing your business.

But let’s stop and think for a while.

Your LinkedIn profile is your identity on LinkedIn. If you need leads, job offers or partnerships, you need to have a stellar profile that clearly communicates who you are and what you offer.

What you probably haven’t realized up until today is that your profile may not be optimized for conversions.

During the typical LinkedIn sign up process, users spend less than an hour filling up all the necessary information. Just the required stuff.

But typical LinkedIn profiles don’t portray expertise. They don’t build trust. And a staggering majority of them aren’t optimized for conversions.

Today, we’re going to show you how to optimize your LinkedIn profile for conversions, and we’re going to focus on the ‘sales pitch’- the summary section that’s vital to get leads to reach out to you.

But let’s first take a look at how to optimize the elements on your profile- one by one:

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
1. Use professional images
2. Have an authentic and intriguing tagline
3. Create content that connects with your target audience
4. Include keywords and media
5. Proofread
6. Have a killer summary
7. 15 LinkedIn Summary Examples to Inspire You

1) Use professional images

LinkedIn is a professional platform where prospects look for people to hire or team up with. It’s not Instagram, Facebook or Snapchat where we see all kinds of crazily filtered images.

A lead will first judge you by your profile photo before anything else.

We went into this in epic detail in our guide on LinkedIn background photos.

Typically, you need a professional headshot for your LinkedIn profile image. If this is costly, use a good quality camera to take a beautiful picture that shows exactly how you look like.

Here are a few more things you need to take care of in your photo:

  • Wear a smile. It looks good 🙂
  • Your face should be clearly visible. Don’t be the guy that uploads a photo from his mountain trek with the face hidden in a hoodie
  • Choose a less distracting background-a plain or white background will do just fine. Use Clipping Magic to remove backgrounds.
  • Wear what you usually put on to work
  • Use the Snappr Photo Analyzer to analyze your photo. They give you a ton of suggestions on image contrast and crop positioning. They’ll even analyze your smile 🙂

2) Have an authentic and intriguing tagline

The tagline is that short phrase that appears right below your profile image. You need to be able to sound authentic and interesting at the same time.

The way you express yourself in your tagline can tell visitors if you are passionate about your work or not. Hard facts are boring.

Consider these tagline examples:

Sam one:  I’m a technical recruiter with six years of practice. I can help you land opportunities.

Sam two: Technical Recruiter | I help people land their dream opportunities

Now, who would you go for?

Personally I’d go for the second Sam. The first Sam comes off as if he is reading from a script we’ve read before. The second one sounds authentic and like he knows what he’s doing.

3) Create content that connects with your target audience

We’ve driven hundreds of millions of views of LinkedIn content.

It’s the one piece that most marketers and salespeople who try to drive leads on LinkedIn miss- LinkedIn content marketing has a killer ROI. It can get you more attention and leads that most other channels.

Write in an appealing way

This is a mistake many people including high-end marketers, designers and growth hackers tend to forget. Lose the jargon. Empty words and buzzwords don’t make you the best. If anything, they make you just as familiar and predictable as the rest.

The one type of content that working out really well for us and for our clients are personal stories.

Take a look at this one:

The reason why these type of posts work so well is simple- they connect with the audience better. The honesty shows through.

And being vulnerable is not a bad thing, even on a professional network like LinkedIn- it shows your human side.

Also, notice how we space them? It’s a copywriting tactic to build momentum as users read through the post, and this style of writing also makes it super easy to read it on LinkedIn.

4) Include keywords and media

Users actually do use LinkedIn search.

You need to use appropriate keywords that showcase your top skills. For Houston’s profile, the keywords would include content marketer, growth hacker, lead generation, growth hacking agency etc. These phrases will help you gain more exposure in LinkedIn search.

Uploading your media can set you apart from the rest on LinkedIn. So if you have recent videos, articles, eBooks or podcasts, link to them or upload them to your summary section- LinkedIn allows clickable files and links here.

5) Proofread

I know.

This one sounds silly.

But we work with clients and help optimize profiles on a daily basis. You wouldn’t believe the number of silly typos on profile pages. It happens a lot more often than you may think.

Always read through your work and rewrite what needs to be rewritten and fix typos. Silly mistakes can cost you the deal of a lifetime. It always helps to have a second opinion- have a friend read through your profile for you.

And now let’s get to the crux of this guide:

6) Have a killer summary

The LinkedIn summary is a piece of prime land you can’t afford to waste.

You have approximately 2000 characters to tell your future clients who you are, what you do, what you have done, how you can help them, and why you are the best choice.

More importantly, your summary needs to be powerful enough to intrigue visitors while still projecting your personal brand. To save you some time, here is a checklist of all the information that must be present in your LinkedIn summary.

Checklist

  • The company/industry you are currently working with/in
  • Your past workplaces/positions and your achievements
  • Skillsets and service offerrings
  • Education (Imperative if you’re looking to land a job)
  • Contact details
  • Call to action

Unlike a traditional resume where employers expect you to keep personal matters to yourself, the LinkedIn summary section gives you a chance to inject your personality into your resume. You can talk about your hobby, tell a story, or drop a few funny lines.

After you’ve laid down everything, be clear on what you want your readers to do. By that, I mean using a call to action. Ask them to reach out to you for a deal, a free eBook, advice or even a cup of coffee via your contact details.

Notice how Houston’s summary incorporates all of the above elements?

He starts with his contact details, and goes to to detail what we do at BAMF Media, clients we’ve worked with, our extensive list of growth hacking services, and our community.

He then sheds some light on his personal side to add some flair.

We then end it off with links to his call scheduling page and the BAMF website.

Simple. Clear. And effective.

Now let’s take a look at some of the best LinkedIn summaries we’ve come across and crafted for our clients:

15 LinkedIn Summary Examples to Inspire You

  1. Ben Lee

Ben’s summary is a stellar example of how storytelling can be used to establish trust and thought leadership.

In a few short lines, we’re able to clearly convey Ben’s expertise in building businesses, and his service offering- building great digital products that succeed.

With the list of achievements and press coverage he received, we also establish Ben as a major player in the space, and someone worth connecting with.

Of course, it pays to be as exhaustive as possible, but it’s better if you can say a lot in a few words. Most people don’t want to read lengthy descriptions.

He also lists out his significant achievements in the tagline just to provide a glimpse of what he is capable of.

A true inspiration, that is why he is the first on my list!

2. Sabir Semerkant

Sabir is a zealous e-commerce growth hacker with vast array of skills under his belt. His background image may not be that optimized (at least according to me), but he got the rest right.

His tagline is really gripping, and you can see from the screenshot above how he uses stellar copy in his summary to grab visitor attention.

Rather than just mention his service offering, which is helping ecommerce businesses grow, he cites real examples of growth he achieved for his clients. This is an excellent way to appeal to clients who have very little faith.

When you have so many special skills that you wish to be known or considered for, the tagline may be limiting. You could list them out in the summary section as Sabir does. This way, you won’t miss out on some opportunities, and at the same time optimize your profile for search.H

3. Jenny Foss

We are going to learn one crucial thing from Jenny Foss-using a personable tone.

If you look at Jenny’s summary, you’ll notice that her summary is short and clean-clearly communicating what she does, with a touch of humour here and there.

Rather than narrate her entire professional life, she briefly talks about the essential things and finishes up with her contact details.

It’s important to avoid boring details and keep your summary short. People have short attention spans. They click, scroll and move on. So it’s good to get your point across as quickly as possible.

4. Melissa Williams

There are two things I love about Melissa’s summary- clarity and simplicity.

Often, you don’t need to drop big name clients you’ve worked with or achievements you’ve bagged. All you need to do is clearly communicate what you offer, who you typically work with, and how your services are helpful.

She also remains authentic in her summary by using the first person rather than third.

5. Robbie Abed

You know you are a skilled marketer when people can’t resist to read your stories and publications. Robbie Knows the importance of a good first impression, and that is why his summary rocks.

He keeps things interesting by narrating his professional life in a way that weaves together facts, stories, and anecdotes. He has also managed to exclude overused LinkedIn buzzwords- something that plagues a lot of summaries.

6. Jonah Silberg

Jonah’s profile is one of the unusual types. Like I mentioned before, people have the attention span of a goldfish and it’s ideal that you feed them interesting bites about yourself that they’re likely to remember.

This chap’s summary ends in the second line. Super crazy, don’t you think?

But you can’t sell yourself well in two sentences, and Jonah knows that.

That’s why he went further to finish his summary in a 37-second video. Pretty amazing if you’d ask me. Additionally, this is a subtle way to showcase his video skills, which is his service offering.

Jonah sprinkled some fun facts in his summary- ‘Kosher caterer’, ‘son of a beverage distributor’ etc, and in the video he actually shows us the pic of his father and someone else who resembles his dad.

Just to remind you, the point here is to remember to have fun while writing your summary, and get your profile visitors to remember you.

7. Muhammad Niaz

Muhammad understands how vital storytelling can be in moving a brand’s influence to the next level.

He starts his summary by telling us a little about his experience of climbing Mt Everest. Literally. And towards the end of the first paragraph, he drops the essence of the story-perseverance.

He says he doesn’t believe in quitting and will always push through the hardest conditions to deliver what’s required. This technique of integrating your life story into your summary can separate you from a pool of many commoners.

Don’t go overboard though, as people might mistake your pitch for bragging.

If you still need to understand more about how the story technique works, check out Brian Massey’s profile.

8. Micah Day

When you are writing a LinkedIn summary, you need to give a 360 degree view of yourself, your role and your company. There is power in being as comprehensive as possible (just as long as you can keep readers hooked).

Micah does that excellently.

She mentions her role, what it entails, and why it matters.

She doesn’t just mention her position- she passionately describes it and gives reasons why she is proud of what she does.

You see- when you brag a little about your abilities and exude passion, people naturally feel attracted, and since Micah is into hiring, I bet that the summary is driving her applications.

9. Jeff Molander

Jeff knows he is on LinkedIn to sell himself and his company.

Right off the bat, he starts to tell his readers that he knows the sales tactics that are working currently. Without wasting more space, he drops some of the services he sells and backs them up with his previous work experience.

At the end of his summary, Jeff doesn’t leave anything to chance; rather he goes ahead to invite his readers to contact him via the contact details on the page.

Jeff’s summary is a great example of a clearly communicated service offering leading to a clear and compelling CTA.

10. Ryan Holmes

Ryan is the founder of Hootsuite- a social media management platform. He also happens to be a top influencer on both LinkedIn and Facebook.

Can’t help but say it- I love the cover image.

He clearly communicates what he does through his ventures- his company, his investment firm, and his books, and shows that he’s a value-driven entrepreneur- someone worth following.

11. Maurice Piggue


For the job seekers ou there, Maurice’s profile is a shining example.

Maurice has done an excellent job of making his summary as exhaustive as possible while keeping it neat (I would have liked more spacing though).

When you’re looking for a job, you need to detail what you’re good at and what you’ve been good at something that Maurice has done very well.

Listen; you can be an acclaimed scriptwriter, a keen blogger or a top-end graphic designer but without showing off your recent publications or designs, you won’t stand a chance.

Prospective employers will want to peruse through your samples or past work experiences before initiating a conversation or presenting an offer. So it’s imperative that you clearly detail them.

The Bottom line

Attractive LinkedIn summaries and well optimized profiles are a requisite if you’re looking to drive leads or connections on LinkedIn.

You need to make a great first impression and make prospects prefer you over millions of other experts on LinkedIn.

If your Linkedin profile lacks luster or hasn’t captured any leads, you need to a complete makeover. We’ve provided you with valuable insights on what you need to do and have covered some LinkedIn summary examples that we love, so that you can emulate them.

As I wrap up the curtains, here is a little reminder:

Strive to make your summary irresistible to leads or recruiters or whoever you’re targeting.

And that’s not hard.

You just need to be authentic, exude passion about your abilities, tell your story, list out your accomplishments, use calls-to-action and use professional images.

Conquering LinkedIn isn’t difficult and optimizing your LinkedIn profile is the first step.

Toodles!

No Comments

Post A Comment