LinkedIn Headline Generator

You’ll see the examples above follow our “combined power formula”, so if you want to do the same you’ll want to formulate it as follows:
Suggested length between 10-30 characters
Number of characters:

Examples:

  • CEO at BAMF
  • Founder & CEO @ Future Foundry
  • CEO, The GLOW
  • Co-Founder of Sable
Suggested length between 10-30 characters
Number of characters:

Examples:

  • 10x Your Personal Brand & Business Growth
  • Creating Products That Challenge People To Rethink The Way They Live
  • Empowering financial equality
Suggested length between 10-30 characters
Number of characters:

Examples:

  • Forbes Top 12 Innovative Founders
  • Founder, SheWorx (Acquired) | USA Hall of Fame Gymnast | Forbes 30U30 | Keynote Speaker
  • CEO, The GLOW
  • Y-Combinator S’19 | Columbia MBA
Suggested length between 5-15 characters
Number of characters:

Examples:

  • Dad 👶
  • Teacher at Heart
  • Podcast Host
  • Family Man
Suggested length between single character
Number of characters:
Character Limit: 100 characters

Result:

How To Optimize Your LinkedIn Headline

Most people are well aware that their headline appears on LinkedIn profiles, say when someone visits it.

But the truth is headlines are front and center all the time.

They’re right alongside your image and name, wherever you appear on the platform.

So, if you’re posting in the feed, people will see your name, picture, and your headline.

When you comment on people’s posts, they see it right below your name.

Which means headlines really matter. It’s how you get people’s attention. Without it, they won’t click into the rest of your profile.

That’s why it’s the second most important thing, after your profile image.✌️

We’re going to cover a few of my best formulas that help with crafting attention-grabbing headlines.

The first?

A job title.

Here’s an example. The CMO at G.M.

It’s straight forward, short and simple ― only used by those with a prestigious position at a really well-known company.

And it’s combinable with several other formulas, so you can build on it, if that’s your thing.

Another formula is to focus on one major achievement

Take a look at Tony Robbins's profile. He starts it off with “#1 New York Times bestselling author.”

A big achievement. It’s going to interest a lot of people.

This is a good tactic to you when you’re really well-known for one thing. 

For instance, Stephen King is known for being a prolific author, so his headline could be “Author of 20+ New York Times bestselling novels.”

Michael Phelps could use “U.S. Olympic swimmer with 28 metals.”

Another headline formula is what I call the tangible benefits formula

This is when you focus on who you serve and what you do for them. It’s super concrete and specific, but also short.

The shortest elevator pitch of all time.

The objective is to focus on the high level. For instance, Jake Jorgovan says “I turn consultants into thought leaders through content marketing.”

This approach is gaining traction on LinkedIn because it gets right to it. It tells people your target audience and offers right away, so no time gets wasted.

Another headline formula is the problem-solution question formula
This is James, and he starts things off by asking “Do you need to buy or sell a subdivision?” Very niche. Then he injects himself as the solution, simply stating “I can help,” ― a solid way of leading the right people to click on his profile. This is how these question headlines work, they just invite people to learn more. So you might want to start things out with:
  •  “Looking for _fill in the blank_?” 
  • “Want to accomplish X?”
  • “Are you tired of this pain point?”
  • “Do you need to get this thing done?”
The final headline formula is called the contact formula, which invites someone to contact you. Kind of similar to the last formula.
The final headline formula is called the contact formula, which invites someone to contact you.
Kind of similar to the last formula.

This includes your email address or website in the headline itself. For example, let’s say you write “Contact me if you need help growing your home services business.” You could add a dash and your email address at the end.

But the ultimate headline formula that we tend to use for clients is the combined power formula.  It includes several elements from the formulas described above, and combines them in a way that positions you as an influencer.

You’ll see some examples of this in the before/after cover images coming up, but for the time being, here’s a breakdown of a few:

Houston Golden (https://x.bamf.co/houston

“10x Your Personal Brand & Business Growth ???? bamf.co/linkedin | Forbes Top 12 Innovative Founders | CEO at BAMF | Dad ????”

Ricky Panzer (https://x.bamf.co/ricky

“Founder & CEO @ Future Foundry | Creating Products That Challenge People To Rethink The Way They Live | Teacher at Heart”

Lisa Carmen Wang (https://x.bamf.co/lisa

“CEO, The GLOW | Founder, SheWorx (Acquired)| USA Hall of Fame Gymnast | Forbes 30U30 | Keynote Speaker | Podcast Host”

Towers Wilen (https://x.bamf.co/towers

“Co-Founder of Sable | Empowering financial equality | Y-Combinator S’19 | Columbia MBA | Family Man”

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